Common mistakes in IELTS – Incorrect omissions (Part 2)

242. The -s or -es of the third person singular omitted

Don’t say. He speak English very well.

√ Say: He speaks English very well.

Take great care not to leave out the -s or -es from the present tense, when the subject is he, she, it, or a noun in the singular.

243. Using don’t instead of doesn’t

Don’t say: He don’t care what he says.

√ Say: He doesn’t care what he says.

Use don’t (= do not) with I, we, you, they, and with plural nouns. Use doesn’t (= does not) with he, she, it and with singular nouns.

244. The -d or -ed of the past tense omitted

Don’t say: I receive a letter yesterday.

√ Say: I received a letter yesterday.

Take care not to leave out the -d or -ed from the past tense or regular verbs. When speaking, pronounce the ending of the past tense clearly.

Third person singular, simple present

1. With the pronouns he, she, it, or any singular noun, the verb in the present tense takes a special ending, -s, -es gift’s: he works, it catches, the sun rises, she worries.

2. When the first person of the verb ends in s, x, ch, s/i. or o, the third person singular takes -es:

I watch               I finish                    I fix                         I go

he watches        he finishes              he fixes                  he goes

3. When the first person of the verb ends in -y with a consonant before it, form the third person singular by changing y into ies:

I carry                I study                      I fly

he carries          he studies                he flies

Note: If there is a vowel before the -y, we only add s for the third person singular: he plays, he enjoys, he obeys.

4. A few verbs are irregular in the third person singular:

I am                   I have

he is                   he has

5. Modal verbs such as will, can, may, must, and ought do NOT change their form in the third person singular:

I will               I can              I may                  I must

he will            he can           he may               he must

Remember: The third person singular of verbs in the present tense takes -s, -es or -ies.

245. The -s, -es or -ies of the plural form omitted

Don’t say: 1 paid six pound for the book.

√ Say: I paid six pounds for the book.

Take tare not to leave out the -s, -es or -ies of the plural number

Note: The following nouns have irregular plurals man, men; women, women; child, children; ox, oxen; foot, feet; tooth, teeth; goose, geese; mouse, mice.

246. The possessive ending omitted

Don’t say: A hen’s egg is different from a pigeon.

√ Say: A hen’s egg is different from a pigeon’s.

If the first noun in a comparison is in the possessive case, the second must also be in the possessive –> My mother’s nose is bagger than my father’s.

247. Omission of the article before a countable noun in the singular

Don’t say: I’ve no money to buy car.

√ Say: I’ve no money to buy a car.

As a rule, use either the or a or an before a countable noun in the singular.

248. Omission of a or an after the verb to be

Don’t say: I’m not teacher, I’m student.

√ Say: I’m not a teacher, I’m a student.

Use the indefinite article a or an to express a singular noun-complement of the verb to be –> There’s an animal in there. It’s a mouse.

249. Omission of a or an after the word half

Don’t say: He drank half glass of milk.

√ Say: He drank half a glass of milk.

Note: Half a glass (an hour, a day, a mile, etc.) is the shortened form of half of a glass (of an hour, of a day, of a mile, etc.)

250. Omission of a or one before hundred, etc.

Don’t say: Hundred years make a century.

√ Say: A hundred years make a century.

Or: One hundred years make a century.

Use the indefinite article a or the numeral one before hundred and thousand

Verb TO BE

Present Tense                      I am/’m, you are/’re, he (she, it) is/’s

                                                We, you, they are/’re.

Past Tense                            I was, you were, he (she, it) was

                                                We, you, they were

Future Tense                        I, you, he (she, it) will/’ll be

                                                We, you, they will/’ll be

Present Perfect                    I, you, have/’ve been, he (she, it) has/’s been

                                                We, you. they have/’ve been

Past Perfect                          I, you, he (she, it) had/’d been

                                                We, you, they had/’d been

Future Perfect                      I, you, he (she, it) will/’ll have been

                                                We, you, they will/’ll have been

Uses of the verb TO be as auxiliary

Use the verb to be:

1. With the Present Participle to form the Continuous Tenses

To be + Present Participle

Example: The sun was shining in the sky.

2. With the Past Participle to form the Passive Form

To be + Past Participle

Example: The letter was written by John.

 

 

Common mistakes in IELTS – Incorrect omissions (Part 2)
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