Develop Your IELTS Vocabulary For IELTS Speaking & Writing

 The Role of The Admission Office

In this excerpt from “Which MBA?”, the Economist Intelligence Unit explains the workings of those who determine prospective students’ fates.

Although getting in is tough, admissions staff invariably present a smiling face. After all, you may be the ideal candidate. As a result, you can expect them to be efficient in answering queries and eventually making an offer of a place. Anecdotal evidence suggests that a common reason for choosing a particular school is the helpfulness of the admissions office. Schools also make an effort to get applicants on campus. Good candidates are much more easily persuaded to sign up when they are physically on campus and can meet the faculty members, sit in on classes and talk to students. Many admissions departments also telephone prospective students to continue the selling process. For those who fit the student profile the school is aiming for, considerable help, in the form of scholarships and even living allowances, can be available.

Like everything else in the MBA world, information technology now dominates the admis­sions process. Most schools accept online applications and most of their websites provide enor­mous amounts of information about programmes, facilities and faculties.

“After talking with classmates, I believe that the admissions committee admitted anyone who helped the GMAT, GPA and stalling salary numbers for the rankings.” Full-time student, US School.

The friendly face of admissions is about attracting applications, however. Once the forms and online submissions start rolling up, the job of admissions changes. The concern then becomes how to select only the best candidates and to make sure that none of the best defect to competing schools. There are good commercial reasons for this. The best students attract the best recruiters and get the best jobs. Graduates who get the best, highest-paid jobs are great advertisements for the school and (the school hopes) grateful and generous alumni.

At first sight the qualities admissions departments look for in candidates are fairly standard. They expect a good first degree (generally the subject is not important, although some schools offer fast tracks to applicant with undergraduate majors in areas such as business studies, econom­ics or finance) and a good GMAT score, although this will vary from school to school. In 2000, for example, Stanford in San Francisco had an average GMAT score of 727 (remember that the maximum score is 800) and London Business School had 690. All schools that require the GMAT have an effective minimum score, and it follows that the higher the average at the school the higher is the minimum requirement. Also required are a solid work background, generally of at least three years good interpersonal skills and leadership potential; a belief that you really want to come to their school; and a “wow” factor that somehow sets candidates apart (this might be an interesting former career such as ballerina or marine corps colonel or charitable work in develop­ing countries).

The decision, however, is entirely in the hands of the admissions office and its director. Directors typically have long experience of selection and claim the ability to spot the students who will and will not succeed. The reality is that for the majority of candidates the judgment is finely balanced and largely subjective. It may also be weighted by considerations that go well beyond the qualities of a particular candidate. For example, the school may want to boost the number of foreign students or increase the average number of years of work experience or GMAT scores. In any case, there will always be a need for a good mix of backgrounds by function and industry for each intake, so a trade-off may be required, for example, between test scores, job responsibilities and international experience.

Applications are theoretically reviewed by an admissions committee, which typically includes members of the faculty. In practice, the admissions director usually has the ultimate say on who is in and who is out, and the committee, if involved at all, will deal only with borderline eases.

Given the link between bright students, bright graduate recruits and grateful graduates, the admissions and careers services departments work closely together. If they decide after review­ing applications that certain candidates have unrealistic goals for their subsequent careers, they may not he prepared to risk their job record by taking them on. Even successful applicants will he encouraged to start the job search early on.

“I thought the admissions process at every school was a joke. It was about who you know, how well you know them, etc.” – Full-time student, US school.

Words and Expressions

  1. excerpt (n): to take a short piece of writing, music, film,… from a longer whole ⇒ “In this excerpt from “Which MBA?”, the Economist Intelligence Unit explains the workings of those who determine prospective students’ fates.”
  2. Economist Intelligence Unit (n): a department which analyzes economy ⇒ “In this excerpt from “Which MBA?”, the Economist Intelligence Unit explains the workings of those who determine prospective students’ fates.”
  3. working (n): the works about something ⇒ “In this excerpt from “Which MBA?”, the Economist Intelligence Unit explains the workings of those who determine prospective students’ fates.”
  4. prospective (adj): expected to do something or to become something ⇒ “In this excerpt from “Which MBA?”, the Economist Intelligence Unit explains the workings of those who determine prospective students’ fates.”
  5. staff (n): all the workers employed in an organization considered as a group ⇒ “Although getting in is tough, admissions staff invariably present a smiling face.”
  6. invariably (adv): always ⇒ “Although getting in is tough, admissions staff invariably present a smiling face.”
  7. present (v): show something ⇒ “Although getting in is tough, admissions staff invariably present a smiling face.”
  8. ideal (adj): perfect, most suitable ⇒ “After all, you may be the ideal
  9. candidate (n): a person who is trying to be elected or is applying for a job ⇒ “After all, you may be the ideal candidate.”
  10. query (n): a question, especially one asking for information or expressing a doubt about something ⇒ “As a result, you can expect them to be efficient in answering queries and eventually making an offer of a place.”
  11. eventually (adv): at the end of a period of time or a series of events ⇒ “As a result, you can expect them to be efficient in answering queries and eventually making an offer of a place.”
  12. anecdotal (adv): based on anecdotes and possibly not true or accurate ⇒ “Anecdotal evidence suggests that a common reason for choosing a particular school is the helpfulness of the admissions office.”
  13. applicant (n): a person who makes a formal request for something (= applies for it), especially for a job, a place at a college or university ⇒ “Schools also make an effort to get applicants on campus.”
  14. sign up (v): to arrange to do a course of study by adding your name to the list of people doing it ⇒ “Good candidates are much more easily persuaded to sign up when they are physically on campus and can meet the faculty members, sit in on classes and talk to students.”
  15. physically (adv): in a way that is connected with a person’s body rather than their mind ⇒ “Good candidates are much more easily persuaded to sign up when they are physically on campus and can meet the faculty members, sit in on classes and talk to students.”
  16. faculty (n): any of the physical or mental abilities that a person is born with ⇒ “Good candidates are much more easily persuaded to sign up when they are physically on campus and can meet the faculty members, sit in on classes and talk to students.”
  17. sit in on (v): to attend a meeting, class,… in order to listen to or learn from it rather than to take an active part ⇒ “Good candidates are much more easily persuaded to sign up when they are physically on campus and can meet the faculty members, sit in on classes and talk to students.”
  18. profile (n): a description of somebody or something that gives useful information ⇒ “For those who fit the student profile the school is aiming for, considerable help, in the form of scholarships and even living allowances, can be available.”
  19. allowance (n): an amount of money that is given to somebody regularly or for a particular purpose ⇒ “For those who fit the student profile the school is aiming for, considerable help, in the form of scholarships and even living allowances, can be available.”
  20. available (adj): something that you can get, buy or find⇒ “For those who fit the student profile the school is aiming for, considerable help, in the form of scholarships and even living allowances, can be available.”
  21. dominate (v): to control or have a lot of influence over somebody/something, especially in an unpleasant way ⇒ “Like everything else in the MBA world, information technology now dominates the admissions process.”
  22. enormous (adj): extremely large ⇒ “Most schools accept online applications and most of their websites provide enor­mous amounts of information about programmes, facilities and faculties.”
  23. facility (n): buildings, services, equipment, etc. that are provided for a particular purpose ⇒ “Most schools accept online applications and most of their websites provide enor­mous amounts of information about programs, facilities and faculties.”
  24. attract (v): if you are attracted by something, it interests you and makes you want it; if you are attracted by somebody, you like or admire them ⇒ “The friendly face of admissions is about attracting applications, however.”
  25. submission (n): the act of accepting that somebody has defeated you and that you must obey them ⇒ “Once the forms and online submissions start rolling up, the job of admissions changes.”
  26. roll up (v): to arrive ⇒ “Once the forms and online submissions start rolling up, the job of admissions changes.”
  27. defect (v): a fault in something or in the way it has been made which means that it is not perfect ⇒ “The concern then becomes how to select only the best candidates and to make sure that none of the best defect to competing schools.”
  28. commercial (adj): connected with the buying and selling of goods and services ⇒ “There are good commercial reasons for this.”
  29. recruiter (n): a person whose job is to find new people to join a company, an organization, the armed forces,… ⇒ “The best students attract the best recruiters and get the best jobs.”
  30. grateful (adj): feeling or showing thanks because somebody has done something kind for you or has done as you asked ⇒ “Graduates who get the best, highest-paid jobs are great advertisements for the school and (the school hopes) grateful and generous alumni.”
  31. generous (adj): giving or willing to give freely; given freely ⇒ “Graduates who get the best, highest-paid jobs are great advertisements for the school and (the school hopes) grateful and generous
  32. alumni (n): the former male and female students of a school, college or university ⇒ “Graduates who get the best, highest-paid jobs are great advertisements for the school and (the school hopes) grateful and generous alumni.”
  33. maximum (adj): as large, fast,… as is possible, or the most that is possible or allowed ⇒ “In 2000, for example, Stanford in San Francisco had an average GMAT score of 727 (remember that the maximum score is 800) and London Business School had 690.”
  34. fast track (n): a quick way to achieve something, for example a high position in a job ⇒ “They expect a good first degree (generally the subject is not important, although some schools offer fast tracks to applicant with undergraduate majors in areas such as business studies, econom­ics or finance) and a good GMAT score, although this will vary from school to school.”
  35. vary (v): to be different from each other in size, shape,… ⇒ “They expect a good first degree (generally the subject is not important, although some schools offer fast tracks to applicant with undergraduate majors in areas such as business studies, econom­ics or finance) and a good GMAT score, although this will vary from school to school.”
  36. minimum (adj): as small as is possible ⇒ “All schools that require the GMAT have an effective minimum score, and it follows that the higher the average at the school the higher is the minimum requirement.”
  37. solid (adj): hard or firm; not in the form of a liquid or gas ⇒ “Also required are a solid work background, generally of at least three years good interpersonal skills and leadership potential; a belief that you really want to come to their school.”
  38. potential (n): something that can develop into something or be developed in the future ⇒ “Also required are a solid work background, generally of at least three years good interpersonal skills and leadership potential; a belief that you really want to come to their school.”
  39. “wow” factor (n): a significant factor ⇒ “and a “wow” factor that somehow sets candidates apart (this might be an interesting former career such as ballerina or marine corps colonel or charitable work in develop­ing countries).”
  40. set apart (v): to make somebody or something different from or better than others ⇒ “and a “wow” factor that somehow sets candidates apart (this might be an interesting former career such as ballerina or marine corps colonel or charitable work in develop­ing countries).”
  41. former (adj): something that existed in earlier times ⇒ “and a “wow” factor that somehow sets candidates apart (this might be an interesting former career such as ballerina or marine corps colonel or charitable work in develop­ing countries).”
  42. ballerina (n): a female dancer in ballet ⇒ “and a “wow” factor that somehow sets candidates apart (this might be an interesting former career such as ballerina or marine corps colonel or charitable work in develop­ing countries).”
  43. marine corps (n): a name of thing ⇒ “and a “wow” factor that somehow sets candidates apart (this might be an interesting former career such as ballerina or marine corps colonel or charitable work in develop­ing countries).”
  44. colonel (n): an officer of high rank in the army, the marines, or the US air force ⇒ “and a “wow” factor that somehow sets candidates apart (this might be an interesting former career such as ballerina or marine corps colonel or charitable work in develop­ing countries).”
  45. charitable (adj): connected with a charity or charities ⇒ “and a “wow” factor that somehow sets candidates apart (this might be an interesting former career such as ballerina or marine corps colonel or charitable work in develop­ing countries).”
  46. typically (adv): used to say that something usually happens in the way that you are stating ⇒ “Directors typically have long experience of selection and claim the ability to spot the students who will and will not succeed.”
  47. claim (v): say something is true ⇒ “Directors typically have long experience of selection and claim the ability to spot the students who will and will not succeed.”
  48. spot (v): small mark ⇒ “Directors typically have long experience of selection and claim the ability to spot the students who will and will not succeed.”
  49. finely (adv): in a beautiful or impressive way ⇒ “The reality is that for the majority of candidates the judgment is finely balanced and largely subjective.”
  50. weight (v): being heavy ⇒ “It may also be weighted by considerations that go well beyond the qualities of a particular candidate.”
  51. boost (v): to make something increase, or become better or more successful ⇒ “For example, the school may want to boost the number of foreign students or increase the average number of years of work experience or GMAT scores.”
  52. function (n): a special activity or purpose of a person or thing ⇒ “In any case, there will always be a need for a good mix of backgrounds by function and industry for each intake, so a trade-off may be required, for example, between test scores, job responsibilities and international experience.”
  53. intake (n): the amount of food, drink,… that you take into your body ⇒ “In any case, there will always be a need for a good mix of backgrounds by function and industry for each intake, so a trade-off may be required, for example, between test scores, job responsibilities and international experience.”
  54. trade off (v): to balance two things or situations that are opposed to each other ⇒ “In any case, there will always be a need for a good mix of backgrounds by function and industry for each intake, so a trade-off may be required, for example, between test scores, job responsibilities and international experience.”
  55. theoretically (adv): in a way that is concerned with the ideas and principles on which a particular subject is based, rather than with practice and experiment ⇒ “Applications are theoretically reviewed by an admissions committee, which typically includes members of the faculty.”
  56. review (v): write a report on a subject or on a series of events ⇒ “Applications are theoretically reviewed by an admissions committee, which typically includes members of the faculty.”
  57. has ultimate say on: something to say ⇒ “In practice, the admissions director usually has the ultimate say on who is in and who is out, and the committee, if involved at all, will deal only with borderline eases.”
  58. involve (v): take part in ⇒ “In practice, the admissions director usually has the ultimate say on who is in and who is out, and the committee, if involved at all, will deal only with borderline eases.”
  59. borderline (adj): not clearly belonging to a particular condition or group; not clearly acceptable ⇒ “In practice, the admissions director usually has the ultimate say on who is in and who is out, and the committee, if involved at all, will deal only with borderline
  60. given (prep): already arranged ⇒ “Given the link between bright students, bright graduate recruits and grateful graduates, the admissions and careers services departments work closely together.”
  61. closely (adv): near in space or time ⇒ “Given the link between bright students, bright graduate recruits and grateful graduates, the admissions and careers services departments work closely
  62. subsequent (adj): happening or coming after something else ⇒ “If they decide after review­ing applications that certain candidates have unrealistic goals for their subsequent careers, they may not he prepared to risk their job record by taking them on.”
  63. take on (v): to employ someone ⇒ “If they decide after review­ing applications that certain candidates have unrealistic goals for their subsequent careers, they may not he prepared to risk their job record by taking them on.”
  64. early on (v): near the beginning of a period of time, an event, a piece of work,… ⇒ “Even successful applicants will he encouraged to start the job search early on.”

Exercises

Fill in each blank with the appropriate word, making changes where necessary

invariably, candidate, excerpt, query, present, eventually, allowance, profile, available, domi­nate, facilities, grateful, submission, maximum, attract

  1. One of the Sunday newspapers is publishing …………… from her new book.
  2. It …………….. rains when I go there.
  3. The grim walls of the prison …………….. a forbidding picture to a new inmate.
  4. They are interviewing ………………. for the job of sales manager.
  5. I’d like to raise a few ……………… here.
  6. He worked so hard that ……………… he made himself ill.
  7. He drew her ………………..
  8. The scholarship includes an …………….. of £100 for hooks.
  9. Details of the competition are …………….. from our head office.
  10. The committee works well together, although sometimes the chairman tends to …….
  11. The kitchen has a garbage disposal and other modem ……………..
  12. His new book has ……………… a lot of attention.
  13. June the third is the last date for …………….. of entries for the competition.
  14. I was most ……………. to John for bringing the books.
  15. What’s the ………….. amount of wine you’re allowed to take through customs duty­ free?

Develop Your IELTS Vocabulary For IELTS Speaking & Writing
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