Develop Your Vocabulary for IELTS Speaking & Writing Through Reading

Two Different Forms of British Leisure Life

British people are always famous for their conservative nature. Nevertheless, they have some interesting ways to enjoy themselves. Of come, because of their different position in the social elite and common people demonstrate different tastes in this respect. If the organization leisure, the Club, is for the VIPs, then the amusement like the Pancake face is for the commons.

Club life started with coffee drinking which began around 1650. Among the most exclusive and famous clubs of London, the Other Club occupies a special position. It was founded in 1911 by Sir Winston Churchill and F.F Smith. Members of this club gather for dinner once a month when Parliament is in session and their traditional meeting plate is the Pirate Room of the Savoy Hotel. These meetings are very prime and informal. The Club has only three rules: 1. The object is to dine, wine and talk; 2. Nothing in the intercourse of the members shall be allowed to interfere with the full rigorous pursuit of party politics; 3. The names of the members of the Executive Committee must remain to be unknown.

Political antagonists, who may new be seen to say a word to each other in public, may dine side by side here and engage in unfettered and amicable conversation. The Other Club is rich in traditions. Many of them originated from Sir Winston Churchill. At his command, a large wooden and black cat was seated near him at dinner with a napkin tied around its neck. The name of the black cat it Kaspar. It was designed and carved from a piece of plain tree in 1926 and was placed near to Sir Winston whenever there were only thirteen at table.

Limited to fifty, the list of membership includes prominent member, of the Commons and the Lords and other distinguished people. It is a non-political club and was given the name the Other Club because it aims always to hear the other mans point of view.

In contrast with the Other Club there is the popular Pancake Day. It is on the first day of Lent, and usually occurs between February 2 and March 8. It is believed to be a reminder of the dap when the consumption of butter and eggs was forbidden during Lent and housewives were anxious to use up all they had left before the start of the frugal period.

At Westminster School, London, the practice of tossing a pancake is carefully observed. Led by a verger, a pancake is carried in procession from Westminster Abbey to the school. The cook, all in white, tosses it high in the air over the heads of young competitors in the school lull and the boy getting hold of the largest portion of it in the scramble, receives a guinea from Abbey funds. The cook is given two guineas for his part.

The most popular and most spectacular pancake custom is the annual Pancake Race at Olney, Buckinghamshire, which is said to have been held since 1450. At the starting line each woman holds a frying pan containing a sizzling pancake. These rules are strictly kept: 1. Competitors must be eighteen or more in age and they must have lived in Olney Parish or Warrington for at least six months prior to the race; 2. Each woman must wear an apron and cover her head with a hat or scarf; 3. Loose-fitting trousers are barred; 4. All competitors must loss their pancakes at least three times during the race, once at the start, once during the final spurt to the church path and once at an optional point during the race.

The first to serve her pancake to the bell ringer at the church door receives from him a traditional kiss and is hailed as the years Pancake Champion.

If the Other Club is a way for a few political elite to enjoy their aristocratic taste of leisure, then the practice of the Pancake Race is purely a folk custom. Although they are different both in form and participants, both of them throw some light on the traditional culture of Britain.

Words and Expressions for IELTS Speaking & Writing

  1. leisure (n): time that is spent doing what you enjoy when you are not working or studying ⇒ “Two different forms of British Leisure Life”
  2. conservative (adj): opposed to great or sudden social change; showing that you prefer traditional styles and values ⇒ “British people are always famous for their conservative nature.”
  3. nature (n): all the plants, animals and things that exist in the universe that are not made by people ⇒ “British people are always famous for their conservative nature.”
  4. life position (n): a place of a person in the society ⇒ “Of come, because of their different position in the social elite and common people demonstrate different tastes in this respect.”
  5. elite (n): small in number but powerful and with a lot of influence, because they are rich, intelligent ⇒ “Of come, because of their different position in the social elite and common people demonstrate different tastes in this respect.”
  6. demonstrate (n): show something clearly ⇒ “Of come, because of their different position in the social elite and common people demonstrate different tastes in this respect.”
  7. respect (n): give an appreciated attitude to someone ⇒ “Of come, because of their different position in the social elite and common people demonstrate different tastes in this respect.”
  8. VIP (very important person): a person who has an important position in the society ⇒ “If the organization leisure, the Club, is for the VIPs, then the amusement like the Pancake face is for the commons.”
  9. Pancake Race (n): a race that people are challenged by frying pancake ⇒ “If the organization leisure, the Club, is for the VIPs, then the amusement like the Pancake face is for the commons.”
  10. start with (v): begin with something ⇒ “Club life started with coffee drinking which began around 1650.”
  11. around (prep): on every side; surrounding somebody or something ⇒ “Club life started with coffee drinking which began around 1650.”
  12. exclusive (adj): only to be used by one particular person or group; only given to one particular person or group ⇒ “Among the most exclusive and famous clubs of London, the Other Club occupies a special position.”
  13. parliament (n): the group of people who are elected to make and change the laws of a country ⇒ “Members of this club gather for dinner once a month when Parliament is in session and their traditional meeting plate is the Pirate Room of the Savoy Hotel.”
  14. in session: a period of time that is spent doing a particular activity ⇒ “Members of this club gather for dinner once a month when Parliament is in session and their traditional meeting plate is the Pirate Room of the Savoy Hotel.”
  15. traditional (adj): old culture ⇒ “Members of this club gather for dinner once a month when Parliament is in session and their traditional meeting plate is the Pirate Room of the Savoy Hotel.”
  16. pirate (n): a special room in Savoy Hotel ⇒ “Members of this club gather for dinner once a month when Parliament is in session and their traditional meeting plate is the Pirate Room of the Savoy Hotel.”
  17. informal (adj): normal ⇒ “These meetings are very prime and informal.”
  18. object (n): someone or something ⇒ “The Club has only three rules: 1. The object is to dine, wine and talk; 2. Nothing in the intercourse of the members shall be allowed to interfere with the full rigorous pursuit of party politics; 3. The names of the members of the Executive Committee must remain to be unknown.”
  19. dine (v): to have dinner ⇒ “The Club has only three rules: 1. The object is to dine, wine and talk; 2. Nothing in the intercourse of the members shall be allowed to interfere with the full rigorous pursuit of party politics; 3. The names of the members of the Executive Committee must remain to be unknown.”
  20. wine (v): to have alcohol ⇒ “The Club has only three rules: 1. The object is to dine, wine and talk; 2. Nothing in the intercourse of the members shall be allowed to interfere with the full rigorous pursuit of party politics; 3. The names of the members of the Executive Committee must remain to be unknown.”
  21. intercourse (n): communication between people or country ⇒ “The Club has only three rules: 1. The object is to dine, wine and talk; 2. Nothing in the intercourse of the members shall be allowed to interfere with the full rigorous pursuit of party politics; 3. The names of the members of the Executive Committee must remain to be unknown.”
  22. interfere with (v): to get involved in and try to influence a situation that does not concern you, in a way that annoys other people ⇒ “The Club has only three rules: 1. The object is to dine, wine and talk; 2. Nothing in the intercourse of the members shall be allowed to interfere with the full rigorous pursuit of party politics; 3. The names of the members of the Executive Committee must remain to be unknown.”
  23. rigorous (adj): done carefully and with a lot of attention to detail ⇒ “The Club has only three rules: 1. The object is to dine, wine and talk; 2. Nothing in the intercourse of the members shall be allowed to interfere with the full rigorous pursuit of party politics; 3. The names of the members of the Executive Committee must remain to be unknown.”
  24. pursuit (n): the act of looking for or trying to find something ⇒ “The Club has only three rules: 1. The object is to dine, wine and talk; 2. Nothing in the intercourse of the members shall be allowed to interfere with the full rigorous pursuit of party politics; 3. The names of the members of the Executive Committee must remain to be unknown.”
  25. Executive Committee (n): high positions in a group ⇒ “The Club has only three rules: 1. The object is to dine, wine and talk; 2. Nothing in the intercourse of the members shall be allowed to interfere with the full rigorous pursuit of party politics; 3. The names of the members of the Executive Committee must remain to be unknown.”
  26. antagonist (n): a person who strongly opposes somebody or something ⇒ “Political antagonists, who may new be seen to say a word to each other in public, may dine side by side here and engage in unfettered and amicable conversation.”
  27. engage in (v): participate in or involve in something ⇒ “Political antagonists, who may new be seen to say a word to each other in public, may dine side by side here and engage in unfettered and amicable conversation.”
  28. unfettered (adj): not controlled or restricted ⇒ “Political antagonists, who may new be seen to say a word to each other in public, may dine side by side here and engage in unfettered and amicable conversation.”
  29. amicable (adj): done or achieved in a polite or friendly way and without arguing ⇒ “Political antagonists, who may new be seen to say a word to each other in public, may dine side by side here and engage in unfettered and amicable conversation.”
  30. tradition (n): old custom or spirit ⇒ “The Other Club is rich in traditions.”
  31. originate from (v): separate from ⇒ “Many of them originated from Sir Winston Churchill.”
  32. napkin (n): a piece of cloth or paper used at meals for protecting your clothes and cleaning your lips and fingers ⇒ “At his command, a large wooden and black cat was seated near him at dinner with a napkin tied around its neck.”
  33. carve (adj): to make objects, patterns by cutting away material from wood or stone ⇒ “It was designed and carved from a piece of plain tree in 1926 and was placed near to Sir Winston whenever there were only thirteen at table.”
  34. plain (adj): easy to see or understand ⇒ “It was designed and carved from a piece of plain tree in 1926 and was placed near to Sir Winston whenever there were only thirteen at table.”
  35. limited to (v): not very great in amount or extent ⇒ “Limited to fifty, the list of membership includes prominent member, of the Commons and the Lords and other distinguished people.”
  36. prominent (adj): important or well known ⇒ “Limited to fifty, the list of membership includes prominent member, of the Commons and the Lords and other distinguished people.”
  37. the Commons (n): name of people ⇒ “Limited to fifty, the list of membership includes prominent member, of the Commons and the Lords and other distinguished people.”
  38. the Lords (n): name of people ⇒ “Limited to fifty, the list of membership includes prominent member, of the Commons and the Lords and other distinguished people.”
  39. distinguished (adj): having an appearance that makes somebody look important or that makes people admire or respect them ⇒ “Limited to fifty, the list of membership includes prominent member, of the Commons and the Lords and other distinguished people.”
  40. point of view (n): opinion of a person ⇒ “It is a non-political club and was given the name the Other Club because it aims always to hear the other mans point of view.”
  41. in contrast with: compare with someone or something ⇒ “In contrast with the Other Club there is the popular Pancake Day.”
  42. popular (adj): liked or enjoyed by a large number of people ⇒ “In contrast with the Other Club there is the popular Pancake Day.”
  43. Lent: name of a festival ⇒ “It is on the first day of Lent, and usually occurs between February 2 and March 8.”
  44. occur (v): happen ⇒ “It is on the first day of Lent, and usually occurs between February 2 and March 8.”
  45. reminder (n): something that makes you think about or remember somebody or something, that you have forgotten or would like to forget ⇒ “It is believed to be a reminder of the dap when the consumption of butter and eggs was forbidden during Lent and housewives were anxious to use up all they had left before the start of the frugal period.”
  46. consumption (n): the act of using energy, food or materials; the amount used ⇒ “It is believed to be a reminder of the dap when the consumption of butter and eggs was forbidden during Lent and housewives were anxious to use up all they had left before the start of the frugal period.”
  47. use up (v): end of something ⇒ “It is believed to be a reminder of the dap when the consumption of butter and eggs was forbidden during Lent and housewives were anxious to use up all they had left before the start of the frugal period.”
  48. frugal (adj): using only as much money or food as is necessary ⇒ “It is believed to be a reminder of the dap when the consumption of butter and eggs was forbidden during Lent and housewives were anxious to use up all they had left before the start of the frugal period.”
  49. toss (v): to throw something lightly or carelessly ⇒ “At Westminster School, London, the practice of tossing a pancake is carefully observed.”
  50. observe (v): see or watch something or someone ⇒ “At Westminster School, London, the practice of tossing a pancake is carefully observed.”
  51. verger (n): an official whose job is to take care of the inside of a church and to perform some simple duties during church services ⇒ “Led by a verger, a pancake is carried in procession from Westminster Abbey to the school.”
  52. procession (n): a line of people or vehicles that move along slowly, especially as part of a ceremony; the act of moving in this way ⇒ “Led by a verger, a pancake is carried in procession from Westminster Abbey to the school.”
  53. Westminster Abbey: name of a person ⇒ “Led by a verger, a pancake is carried in procession from Westminster Abbey to the school.”
  54. competitor (n): a person or an organization that competes against others, especially in business ⇒ “The cook, all in white, tosses it high in the air over the heads of young competitors in the school lull and the boy getting hold of the largest portion of it in the scramble, receives a guinea from Abbey funds.”
  55. get hold of (v): maintain something ⇒ “The cook, all in white, tosses it high in the air over the heads of young competitors in the school lull and the boy getting hold of the largest portion of it in the scramble, receives a guinea from Abbey funds.”
  56. portion (n): one part of something larger ⇒ “The cook, all in white, tosses it high in the air over the heads of young competitors in the school lull and the boy getting hold of the largest portion of it in the scramble, receives a guinea from Abbey funds.”
  57. scramble (n): to move quickly, especially with difficulty, using your hands to help you ⇒ “The cook, all in white, tosses it high in the air over the heads of young competitors in the school lull and the boy getting hold of the largest portion of it in the scramble, receives a guinea from Abbey funds.”
  58. guinea (n): an old British gold coin or unit of money worth 21 shillings (= now £1.05). Prices are sometimes still given in guineas, for example when buying or selling horses ⇒ “The cook, all in white, tosses it high in the air over the heads of young competitors in the school lull and the boy getting hold of the largest portion of it in the scramble, receives a guinea from Abbey funds.”
  59. fund (n): an amount of money that has been saved or has been made available for a particular purpose ⇒ “The cook, all in white, tosses it high in the air over the heads of young competitors in the school lull and the boy getting hold of the largest portion of it in the scramble, receives a guinea from Abbey funds.”
  60. for one’s part: one part of someone or something ⇒ “The cook is given two guineas for his part.”
  61. spectacular (adj): very impressive ⇒ “The most popular and most spectacular pancake custom is the annual Pancake Race at Olney, Buckinghamshire, which is said to have been held since 1450.”
  62. custom (n): an accepted way of behaving or of doing things in a society or a community ⇒ “The most popular and most spectacular pancake custom is the annual Pancake Race at Olney, Buckinghamshire, which is said to have been held since 1450.”
  63. annual (adj): happening or done once every year ⇒ “The most popular and most spectacular pancake custom is the annual Pancake Race at Olney, Buckinghamshire, which is said to have been held since 1450.”
  64. frying pan (n): a pan for frying ⇒ “At the starting line each woman holds a frying pan containing a sizzling pancake.”
  65. contain (v): include something ⇒ “At the starting line each woman holds a frying pan containing a sizzling pancake.”
  66. sizzling (adj): very hot ⇒ “At the starting line each woman holds a frying pan containing a sizzling pancake.”
  67. keep (v): hold something ⇒ “These rules are strictly kept: 1. Competitors must be eighteen or more in age and they must have lived in Olney Parish or Warrington for at least six months prior to the race.”
  68. Parish (n): name of a place ⇒ “These rules are strictly kept: 1. Competitors must be eighteen or more in age and they must have lived in Olney Parish or Warrington for at least six months prior to the race.”
  69. prior to (v): happening or existing before something else or before a particular time ⇒ “These rules are strictly kept: 1. Competitors must be eighteen or more in age and they must have lived in Olney Parish or Warrington for at least six months prior to the race.”
  70. apron (n): a piece of clothing worn over the front of the body, from the chest or the waist down, and tied around the waist ⇒ “These rules are strictly kept: 1. Competitors must be eighteen or more in age and they must have lived in Olney Parish or Warrington for at least six months prior to the race; 2. Each woman must wear an apron and cover her head with a hat or scarf.”
  71. scarf (n): a piece of cloth that is worn around the neck, for example for warmth or decoration.  ⇒ “These rules are strictly kept: 1. Competitors must be eighteen or more in age and they must have lived in Olney Parish or Warrington for at least six months prior to the race; 2. Each woman must wear an apron and cover her head with a hat or scarf.
  72. loose-fitting (adj): not fitting the body tightly ⇒ “These rules are strictly kept: 1. Competitors must be eighteen or more in age and they must have lived in Olney Parish or Warrington for at least six months prior to the race; 2. Each woman must wear an apron and cover her head with a hat or scarf; 3. Loose-fitting trousers are barred.”
  73. bar (v): eliminate ⇒ “These rules are strictly kept: 1. Competitors must be eighteen or more in age and they must have lived in Olney Parish or Warrington for at least six months prior to the race; 2. Each woman must wear an apron and cover her head with a hat or scarf; 3. Loose-fitting trousers are barred.”
  74. spurt (n): to burst or pour out suddenly; to produce sudden, powerful streams of liquid or flames ⇒ “These rules are strictly kept: 1. Competitors must be eighteen or more in age and they must have lived in Olney Parish or Warrington for at least six months prior to the race; 2. Each woman must wear an apron and cover her head with a hat or scarf; 3. Loose-fitting trousers are barred; 4. All competitors must loss their pancakes at least three times during the race, once at the start, once during the final spurt to the church path and once at an optional point during the race.”
  75. optional (adj): something that you can choose to do or have if you want to ⇒ “These rules are strictly kept: 1. Competitors must be eighteen or more in age and they must have lived in Olney Parish or Warrington for at least six months prior to the race; 2. Each woman must wear an apron and cover her head with a hat or scarf; 3. Loose-fitting trousers are barred; 4. All competitors must loss their pancakes at least three times during the race, once at the start, once during the final spurt to the church path and once at an optional point during the race.”
  76. serve (v): to give somebody food or drink, for example at a restaurant or during a meal ⇒ “The first to serve her pancake to the bell ringer at the church door receives from him a traditional kiss and is hailed as the years Pancake Champion.”
  77. hail (v): to call to somebody in order to say hello to them or attract their attention ⇒ “The first to serve her pancake to the bell ringer at the church door receives from him a traditional kiss and is hailed as the years Pancake Champion.”
  78. champion (n): a winner ⇒ “The first to serve her pancake to the bell ringer at the church door receives from him a traditional kiss and is hailed as the years Pancake Champion.”
  79. aristocrat (adj): a member of a group ⇒ “If the Other Club is a way for a few political elite to enjoy their aristocratic taste of leisure, then the practice of the Pancake Race is purely a folk custom.”
  80. purely (adv): only, completely ⇒ “If the Other Club is a way for a few political elite to enjoy their aristocratic taste of leisure, then the practice of the Pancake Race is purely a folk custom.”
  81. participant (n): a person who involves in some situation ⇒ “Although they are different both in form and participants, both of them throw some light on the traditional culture of Britain.”
  82. throw light on (v): focus on someone or something ⇒ “Although they are different both in form and participants, both of them throw some light on the traditional culture of Britain.”

Exercises 

Fill in each blank with the appropriate word, making changes where necessary

elite, leisure, conservative, respect, demonstrate, object, exclusive, interfere, rigorous, amicable, pursuit, prominent, consumption, distinguished, originate

1. Reading is a pleasant way to spend one’s …………………..

2. Old people tend to be ……………….. in their attitudes.

3. Only the educational ………………… goes to Oxford or Cambridge.

4. I will now ………………… how the machine works.

5. This room is fine except in one ………………….. – what can I sit on?

6. This is an …………………. boarding school catering to the children of the wealthy.

7. What’s the …………………. of this research?

8. The sound of the radio upstairs ……………….. with my work.

9. The examination is …………………… in the extreme.

10. The whole magazine is produced and edited in the …………………… of excellence.

11. We reached an …………………… agreement.

12. Her book ………………… from a short story.

13. Bach was a …………………. musician.

14. He is ………………… for his knowledge of economics.

15. ………………….. of oil has declined in recent years.

Develop Your Vocabulary for IELTS Speaking & Writing Through Reading
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